Monthly Archives: May 2020

Three journalists awarded CAJ President’s Award for Wet’suwet’en coverage

2022-12-19T17:43:25-05:00

Each year the Charles Bury President's Award is given under circumstances of exceptional merit to those people or organizations that have made a significant contribution to Canadian journalism. This year, the award is presented to Jerome Turner, Jesse Winter and Amber Bracken for their dedicated reporting and, in particular, for protecting the public's right to know how events unfolded at Wet'suwet'en. Here are the remarks on that award from CAJ president, Karyn Pugliese:  Police have been trying to keep journalists away from important stories.  We've seen this.  After events at Kanesatake in 1990, police blocked reporters from Gustafsen Lake Lake. [...]

Three journalists awarded CAJ President’s Award for Wet’suwet’en coverage2022-12-19T17:43:25-05:00

Congratulations to the 2019 CAJ Awards recipients!

2022-12-19T17:55:38-05:00

OTTAWA, May 30, 2020 / CNW / The Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2019 CAJ Awards for outstanding investigative journalism. This included presenting the McGillivray Award to Craig Silverman of BuzzFeed News, for his multi-part look at how one company successfully used Facebook, and fake news posts, to lure people into subscription-based services that only ended up ripping them off. BuzzFeed’s work showed how the company even used Canadian celebrities to bait people in this country, and led to Facebook taking some action and the company itself falling apart. Earlier in the [...]

Congratulations to the 2019 CAJ Awards recipients!2022-12-19T17:55:38-05:00

Liberals can salvage broken ATIP system if they muster political will

2022-11-17T18:49:30-05:00

OTTAWA, May 11, 2020 / CNW /—The access-to-information system, an essential service providing Canadians information about the internal workings of government, is at a near standstill. Delays have produced huge backlogs that are overwhelming departments. This comes at a time when the federal government spends billions of dollars in emergency aid with minimal parliamentary scrutiny. The system is often the only means of transparency that allows  Canadians to hold their government accountable for its actions such as its rapid-fire pandemic response. “The system was in crisis for years before the pandemic, with journalists sometimes waiting years on requests. We warned [...]

Liberals can salvage broken ATIP system if they muster political will2022-11-17T18:49:30-05:00
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