Blog

In wake of newsroom cuts, Canada should embrace non-profit journalism

OTTAWA, Aug. 11, 2016 – Torontonians and Canadians will be information poorer as a result of the Toronto Star’s recent decision to lay off 45 newsroom staff – something the Canadian Association of Journalists believes further heightens the need for government action to foster and support public-interest reporting.

At a time when cutbacks have reduced many papers to recycling rather than reporting the news, the Toronto Star – home to one of the few investigative journalism teams in the country – has distinguished itself with a continuing commitment to truth-finding and truth-telling.

But this week, the Toronto Star announced it was eliminating 52 positions – including 45 from its newsroom.

“These cuts will inevitably compromise the paper’s capacity to cover public issues in Toronto, Ontario and Canada as a whole – resulting in less-informed citizens, less-informed consumers and a more ignorant society,” said CAJ President Nick Taylor-Vaisey.

“A panel of MPs is currently studying the state of the Canadian media. But this news brings into relief the urgent need for the government to move from study to action,” he added.

Taylor-Vaisey said such measures could include the removal of restrictions that obstruct charitable support for non-profit journalistic endeavours. In the U.S., such efforts have helped fill the gap in coverage created by cutbacks at for-profit news outlets.

The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing over 600 members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide high?quality professional development for its members and public?interest advocacy.

For further information:

Nick Taylor-Vaisey, CAJ president, 647-968-2393 cell, nick@caj.ca

www.caj.ca | www.facebook.com/CdnAssocJournalists | www.twitter.com/CAJ

Read More

In wake of newsroom cuts, Canada should embrace non-profit journalism

OTTAWA, Aug. 11, 2016 – Torontonians and Canadians will be information poorer as a result of the Toronto Star’s recent decision to lay off 45 newsroom staff – something the Canadian Association of Journalists believes further heightens the need for government action to foster and support public-interest reporting.

At a time when cutbacks have reduced many papers to recycling rather than reporting the news, the Toronto Star – home to one of the few investigative journalism teams in the country – has distinguished itself with a continuing commitment to truth-finding and truth-telling.

But this week, the Toronto Star announced it was eliminating 52 positions – including 45 from its newsroom.

“These cuts will inevitably compromise the paper’s capacity to cover public issues in Toronto, Ontario and Canada as a whole – resulting in less-informed citizens, less-informed consumers and a more ignorant society,” said CAJ President Nick Taylor-Vaisey.

“A panel of MPs is currently studying the state of the Canadian media. But this news brings into relief the urgent need for the government to move from study to action,” he added.

Taylor-Vaisey said such measures could include the removal of restrictions that obstruct charitable support for non-profit journalistic endeavours. In the U.S., such efforts have helped fill the gap in coverage created by cutbacks at for-profit news outlets.

The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing over 600 members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide high?quality professional development for its members and public?interest advocacy.

For further information:
Nick Taylor-Vaisey, CAJ president, 647-968-2393 cell, nick@caj.ca

Read More

Global, BuzzFeed cuts diminish public’s right to know

OTTAWA, June 30, 2016 – Thanks to recent newsrooms cutbacks, our country has lost a team of investigative reporters and a parliamentary bureau – something the Canadian Association of Journalists believes will further compromise the right of citizens to know and understand what’s happening in their own society.

Earlier this week, Global announced it was cancelling 16×9, a public affairs show that was nominated for the CWA Canada/CAJ award for labour reporting earlier this year—and won RTDNA’s Dan McArthur Award for In-depth and Investigative Multi-platform Reporting earlier this month.

At the same time, BuzzFeed announced it was shuttering its Ottawa bureau just over a year after it opened, with the promise of bringing political news to younger audiences.

“At its best, journalism serves the public interest by holding power to account. But these newsrooms cuts directly target the capacity of those outlets to do this kind of work,” said CAJ President Nick Taylor-Vaisey. “That marginalizes the place of news media in a democratic society.”

The 16×9 cuts further diminish the number of investigative journalist teams in Canada, an already rare sight even in major newsrooms. And BuzzFeed’s shift away from Ottawa misses an opportunity to engage young Canadians with parliamentary politics.

“Canadians can’t afford to lose a group of reporters who commit serious time and resources to investigations in the public interest—and reach new audiences,” said Taylor-Vaisey. “This moves mean fewer critical eyes and ears on governments that need to be doggedly watched, heard and held to account.”

The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing over 600 members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide high-quality professional development for its members and public-interest advocacy.

For further information: Nick Taylor-Vaisey, CAJ president, 647-968-2393, nick@caj.ca; www.caj.ca

Read More

Anti-secrecy recommendations must be acted on: CAJ

OTTAWA, June 17, 2016 — The Canadian Association of Journalists applauds an all-party committee of MPs for recommending reforms that could make the federal government less secretive. But it remains to be seen if Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will actually act on them, helping fulfill his promise to run a more “open and transparent” government.

The CAJ appeared before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics in April. During that appearance, CAJ vice-president Sean Holman called on members to significantly reduce the “expansive zone of secrecy surrounding the government’s decision-making processes” and legally require the proactive publication of broad categories of government records. (Read the CAJ’s full submission to the committee here.)

Under the existing Access to Information Act, the government can refuse access to any recommendations developed for public officials, as well as accounts of their consultations or deliberations, for a 20-year period. The law also prohibits access to any records related to cabinet, government’s principle decision-making body, for the same period.

In a report released Thursday, the committee recommended the government reduce that time period. The committee also recommended that the public be allowed immediate access to some kinds of records that may currently be inaccessible because they are classified as policy advice or cabinet material. And it called for a legal mechanism to ensure the government is unable to censor any information that is related to an environmental, health, public safety or other public interest issue.

“These are all important steps along the long road to less government secrecy in this country,” said Canadian Association of Journalists president Nick Taylor-Vaisey, who noted the committee also recommended institutions be “required to proactively publish information that is clearly in the public interest.”

“Canadians don’t have access to the same kind of information that Americans do and it is well past time that changed,” continued Taylor-Vaisey. “But for that to happen, the Trudeau government must resist the seductive power of secrecy – something almost no past or present government in Canada has been able to do.”

The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing over 600 members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide high-quality professional development for its members and public interest advocacy.

For further information: Nick Taylor-Vaisey, CAJ president, 647-968-2393 cell, nick@caj.ca; Sean Holman, CAJ vice-president, 403-397-4751 cell, sean@caj.ca

Read More

Government 'openness' policy may mean greater secrecy

Last month, the British Columbia government announced it would be publishing requests for information filed under its records access law, something it says will increase openness and accountability. But many reporters are worried that law will actually do exactly the opposite. To find out why, and what the Canadian Association of Journalists is doing about it, read our open letter to the province’s information and privacy commissioner Elizabeth Denham.

Read More

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 CAJ Awards!

EDMONTON, May 29, 2016 /CNW/ – In a year when Canada’s national media finally awoke to the tragedies of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, the work by our national public broadcaster set the standard.

The CBC News Aboriginal team, supported by others across the CBC News team, are the recipients of the 2015 Don McGillivray Award, given to the top investigative entry into the annual CAJ Awards program at the gala which concluded #CAJ16 at the Coast Edmonton Plaza Hotel.

The elements of the CBC’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women website were among the first to be published, told the stories of those affected in an impactful way and, somewhat sadly, led to the identification of even more Indigenous women as missing or murdered. McGillivray judges noted these elements in their deliberations, in a year when one of the other candidates for the top investigative award was also focused on MMIW.

CBC News’ entry had been named recipient of the Online Media category earlier on Saturday, one of 14 recipients recognized across the CAJ Awards program. The winning entries in most categories received a $500 cash prize.

The full list of 2015 CAJ Awards recipients is below.

Please note the media outlet listed is where the recipient(s) worked at the time their entry was broadcast/published or where the particular entry was broadcast/published. Links, where available, have been provided in the titles of the recipients’ entries.

The recipients in the OPEN MEDIA category are:

Andrew Bailey, David Bruser, Astrid Lange, Jim Rankin, Randy Risling, Joanna Smith, Rick Sznajder, Tanya Talaga, Jennifer Wells
Gone: Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women
The Toronto Star

The recipient in the COMMUNITY MEDIA category is:

Ian Hitchen
The Runaways
The Brandon Sun

The recipient in the OPEN BROADCAST FEATURE category is:

Karin Wells
‘In the presence of a spoon’
CBC Radio One – The Sunday Edition

The recipients in the OPEN BROADCAST NEWS category are:

Anton Koschany, Victor Malarek, Sarah Stevens, Brett Mitchell
Phantom Menace
CTV – W5

The recipients in the COMMUNITY BROADCAST category are:

Natalie Clancy, Paisley Woodward
Real estate seminars exposed
CBC News – Vancouver

The recipients in the CAJ / MARKETWIRED DATA JOURNALISM AWARD are:

Diana Swain, Timothy Sawa, Lori Ward
Campus sexual assaults: The fight to get the real picture
CBC News Investigative Unit – CBC – The National

The recipients in the ONLINE MEDIA category are:

Cate Friesen, Cecil Rosner, Connie Walker, Duncan McCue, Tiar Wilson, Kimberly Ivany, Martha Troian, Chantelle Bellrichard, Joanne Levasseur,Teghan Beaudette, Kristy Hoffman, Donna Lee, Tara Lindemann, William Wolfe-Wylie, Richard Grasley, Michael Leschart, Michael Pereira
Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
CBC News

The recipient in the PHOTOJOURNALISM category is:

John Lehmann
Portfolio entry
The Globe and Mail

The recipient in the SCOOP category is:

Bruce Cheadle
Omnibus budget bill rewrites history to clear RCMP of potential criminal charges
The Canadian Press

The recipient in the DAILY EXCELLENCE category is:

Margaret Evans
Paris Mourns
CBC Radio One – The World This Weekend

The recipient in the TEXT FEATURE category is:

Shannon Proudfoot
Jo has Alzheimer’s. He’s 38
Maclean’s

The recipients in the JHR / CAJ AWARD FOR HUMAN RIGHTS REPORTING are:

Dennis Ward, Murray Oliver
A soldier scorned
APTN Investigates

The recipients in the CWA CANADA / CAJ AWARD FOR LABOUR REPORTING are:

Melissa Ridgen
Hurting for work
APTN Investigates

and

Nick Purdon, Leonardo Palleja
Up close: Prison guards
CBC News – The National

The recipients in the CAJ / CNW GROUP STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE are:

Amara McLaughlin, Jesse Yardley
Risky decisions for Canadian cancer patients
Calgary Journal / Mount Royal University

There were a total 230 entries for the 2015 awards program.

Congratulations to all our recipients. Your work has been outstanding, inspiring and a reminder of how despite the unending fiscal challenges facing our industry, Canadian journalists still produce plenty of amazing, important and impactful journalism. We thank you for entering.

Read More

The latest winner of the CAJ Code of Silence: FinTRAC

EDMONTON, May 28, 2016 — The winner of the Canadian Association of Journalists’ most dubious award in 2016 is the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada, the country’s little known “financial intelligence unit” that’s meant to, among other things, “facilitate the detection, prevention and deterrence of money laundering.”

Earlier this year, FinTRAC reportedly fined an undisclosed bank a total of $1.1 million for “failing to report a suspicious transaction and various money transfers”—but the agency, choosing to “exercise its discretion,” wouldn’t name the bank.

That secrecy made FinTRAC a natural choice for the CAJ’s annual Code of Silence Award, which is handed out (sic) to the government or publicly funded agency that works the hardest to hide public information.

“The penalty was designed to send a message of deterrence,” said the Toronto Star‘s Robert Cribb, a former CAJ president who wrote the agency’s nomination. Cribb added that declining to name the bank “dramatically softens that deterrence by shrouding the mystery bank’s conduct in secrecy.

“FinTRAC routinely identifies individuals and companies it takes action against. In fact, many are listed on the agency’s website,” Cribb continued. “A public watchdog agency hiding the identity of a bank found to have breached the public interest has earned the right to claim the Code of Silence Award.”

The CAJ agrees. This is the 16th year the organization has presented a Code of Silence.

The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing over 600 members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide high-quality professional development for its members and public-interest advocacy.

For further information:

Nick Taylor-Vaisey, CAJ president – 647-968-2393 cell, nick@caj.ca

Read More

Lagging behind: CAJ VP testifies before #cdnfoi committee on Parliament Hill

Yesterday, CAJ Vice-President and #cdnfoi expert Sean Holman spoke before the federal Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics. Read the CAJ’s submission to the committee.

Holman urged committee members to take seriously the concrete recommendations that Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault made in a damning 2015 report , but he said the government must go further. At the heart of the problem, Holman said, is Canada’s political culture and system, which has always favoured secrecy over openness – something that shaped the Access to Information Act and continues to inform the response that publically-funded bodies have to public scrutiny.

Access to government information is essential for journalists if we want to do more than repeat government and opposition propaganda,” says Holman. “Unfortunately, Canada has always been and continues to be a laggard when it comes to that kind of access. The recommendations we’ve made to the committee would change that.”

We live-tweeted Holman’s testimony:

 

Read More

CAJ marks 15 years of the Code of Silence Award

OTTAWA, April 20, 2016 /CNW/ - It's a tongue-in-cheek idea with serious overtones that was first presented 15 years ago – the Canadian Association of Journalists' Code of Silence.

Nursed to life by past-president Rob Cribb, the idea was to "celebrate" Canada's most-secretive government, department, agency or publicly funded body. Who was putting that extra bit of elbow grease into keeping any sunlight from reaching the public's business?

The "winner" that first year? The Ontario Ministry of the Environment.

Starting today, the CAJ is accepting nominations from journalists working in Canada who've been fighting the good fight to pry public information out of the hands of bureaucrats and politicians from sea, to sea, to sea.

Nominators are asked to think big and small – previous winners include the entire federal government, omnibus government legislation, a former prime minister's office and several government departments federally and provincially. They also include the Resort Municipality of Whistler and come from questions as simple as how many fish were being spawned at a federal facility – an answer shared with tour groups but not with an inquiring journalist before the spin masters were involved.

If it takes and/or spends public money and isn't being open and transparent about how it does so, it's an eligible nominee.

Do you have an egregious example that gets your own blood boiling? Nominations can be e-mailed to our president at nick@caj.ca.

The winner will be announced during the closing banquet for the #CAJ16 conference at the Coast Edmonton Plaza Hotel on May 28. Registration for the entire conference is open, with early bird rates ending May 20.

Read More

Congratulations to all the 2015 CAJ Awards finalists!

OTTAWA, April 7, 2016 /CNW/ – The Canadian Association of Journalists is pleased to announce the finalists for its annual awards for outstanding investigative journalism in Canada published or broadcast in 2015.

The winning entry in most categories will receive a $500 cash prize. The recipients in each category will be announced May 28 at the CAJ Awards gala and conference banquet in Edmonton, part of the #CAJ16 annual conference at the Coast Edmonton Plaza Hotel.

Delegates registering for the full conference (May 27-28) in most registration categories get a banquet ticket as part of their registration. Standalone tickets are also available at a cost of $55. Register and purchase tickets today via the conference registration pageEarly bird rates for the conference run until May 20.

Awards finalists registering for the conference – either one-day plus gala or full conference – are automatically eligible for a 10% discount off the relevant fee. If your organization wants to send more than five finalists to the conference, a 25% discount is available. Contact us to confirm eligibility and register.

The Don McGillivray Award for the best overall investigative report for 2015 will also be announced at the awards banquet.

Please note the media outlet listed is where the finalist worked at the time their entry was broadcast/published or where the particular entry was broadcast/published. Finalists are listed alphabetically by media outlet. Links, where available, have been provided in the titles of the finalists’ entries.

The finalists in the OPEN MEDIA category are:

Nahlah Ayed, Tracy Seeley, Richard Devey
Refugee crisis: Walking across a continent
CBCNews.ca

Harvey Cashore, Frederic Zalac, Dave Seglins, Alexandra Byers
KPMG – The Isle of Sham
CBC News

Dylan Robertson
The Radical Reality: Canada and Homegrown Terrorism
Calgary Herald

Kathryn Blaze Baum, Renata D’Aliesio, Matthew McClearn, Kristy Hoffman, Laura Blenkinsop, Christopher Manza
A Country’s Crisis: An Investigation into Canada’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
The Globe and Mail

Andrew Bailey, David Bruser, Astrid Lange, Jim Rankin, Randy Risling, Joanna Smith, Rick Sznajder, Tanya Talaga, Jennifer Wells
Gone: Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women
The Toronto Star

The finalists in the COMMUNITY MEDIA category are:

Travis Lupick
Chasing a crisis: The challenge of caring for Vancouver’s severely mentally ill and addicted residents
Georgia Straight

Joseph Couture
Series on homelessness, drug addiction and mental illness
Freelance / London Yodeler

Matt Goerzen
Breaking faith
The Brandon Sun

Ian Hitchen
The Runaways
The Brandon Sun

Gagandeep Ghuman
Here’s what got buried under the rock
The Squamish Reporter

The finalists in the OPEN BROADCAST FEATURE category are:

Kathleen Martens
For the love of Matty
APTN Investigates

Harvey Cashore, Terence McKenna, Joseph Loiero, Alexandra Byers, Zach Dubinsky, Chelsea Gomez,, Nicole Reinert, Greg McArthur
The Mob and Michael DeGroote
CBC News – The Fifth Estate / The Globe and Mail

Kelly Crowe, Marcy Cuttler
A price to pay
CBC News – The National

Karin Wells
‘In the presence of a spoon’
CBC Radio One – The Sunday Edition

Avis Favaro, Elizabeth St. Philip, Brett Mitchell, Anton Koschany
Gordie’s comeback
CTV – W5

The finalists in the OPEN BROADCAST NEWS category are:

Tiffany Foxcroft,Tyana Grundig, Erica Johnson
Coffee Cups
CBC Marketplace

Angela McIvor
Crisis in Rape Funding
CBC News – Nova Scotia

Adrienne Arsenault, Nazim Baksh
Canadian Jihadis
CBC News – The National

Heather Evans, John Lancaster, Sarah Bridge
Border Investigation
CBC News – Toronto

Anton Koschany,Victor Malarek, Sarah Stevens, Brett Mitchell
Phantom Menace
CTV – W5

The finalists in the COMMUNITY BROADCAST category are:

Jennie Russell, Charles Rusnell
Smoked out
CBC News – Edmonton

Natalie Clancy, Paisley Woodward
Real estate seminars exposed
CBC News – Vancouver

The finalists in the CAJ / MARKETWIRED DATA JOURNALISM AWARD are:

Diana Swain, Timothy Sawa, Lori Ward
Campus sexual assaults: The fight to get the real picture
CBC News Investigative Unit – CBC – The National

Anna Mehler Paperny, Leslie Young
Abortions for some
Global News

Bill Curry, Chris Hannay
Infrastructure spending in Conservative ridings
The Globe and Mail

Gordon Hoekstra, Larry Pynn
Pride & Power: First Nations and the B.C. economy
Vancouver Sun

Jeff Outhit
Where trouble lives
Waterloo Region Record

The finalists in the ONLINE MEDIA category are:

Paul Watson
The Wreck Of HMS Erebus: How A Landmark Discovery Triggered A Fight For Canada’s History
Freelance / Buzzfeed News Canada

Susana Mas
Temporary foreign workers favoured under express entry
CBCNews.ca

Cate Friesen, Cecil Rosner, Connie Walker, Duncan McCue, Tiar Wilson, Kimberly Ivany, Martha Troian, Chantelle Bellrichard, Joanne Levasseur,Teghan Beaudette, Kristy Hoffman, Donna Lee, Tara Lindemann, William Wolfe-Wylie, Richard Grasley, Michael Leschart, Michael Pereira
Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
CBC News

Joshua Hergesheimer
Oil patch downturn puts dreams on hold – a series on the human costs behind the falling price of oil
National Observer

Elizabeth McSheffrey, Linda Solomon Wood, Jenny Uechi
Furry fiasco
National Observer

The finalists in the PHOTOJOURNALISM category are:

Larry Wong
Portfolio entry
Edmonton Journal

Darryl Dyck
Portfolio entry
Freelance / The Canadian Press

John Lehmann
Portfolio entry
The Globe and Mail

Steve Russell
Portfolio entry
The Toronto Star

The finalists in the SCOOP category are:

Jill Macyshon
Manitoba’s Foster Care Crisis
CTV National News

Linda Solomon Wood, Jenny Uechi, Sandy Garossino, Mychaylo Prystupa
Oil’s hidden route to Harper
National Observer
*The authorship of this submission is under dispute.

Bruce Cheadle
Omnibus budget bill rewrites history to clear RCMP of potential criminal charges
The Canadian Press

Colin Perkel
Faulty Juror Eligibility Forms
The Canadian Press

The finalists in the DAILY EXCELLENCE category are:

Jorge Barrera, Damian Joseph
Lac La Ronge Fires
APTN National News

Margaret Evans
Paris Mourns
CBC Radio One – The World This Weekend

John Vennavally-Rao
Atom Smasher
CTV National News

Kim Bolan
Terror suspect was a classic loner
Vancouver Sun

Kevin Rollason
Phone Scam
Winnipeg Free Press

The finalists in the TEXT FEATURE category are:

Althia Raj
How Trudeau Won
Huffington Post Canada

Shannon Proudfoot
Jo has Alzheimer’s. He’s 38
Maclean’s

Angela Sterritt
A Movement Rises
OpenCanada.org

Matthew Pearson
The Passenger
Ottawa Citizen

Andrea Hill
Who is it now? When sirens wail in La Loche, people can’t help but wonder if it’s yet another suicide
Saskatoon StarPhoenix

The finalists in the JHR / CAJ AWARD FOR HUMAN RIGHTS REPORTING are:

Dennis Ward, Murray Oliver
A soldier scorned
APTN Investigates

Tamar Weinstein, Lynette Fortune, Mark Kelley, Liz Rosch
Too young to lose
CBC News – The Fifth Estate

Nahlah Ayed, Tracy Seeley, Richard Devey
Inside India’s gender revolution
CBC News – The National

Joe Friesen
The perilous journey from Myanmar to freedom
The Globe and Mail

Olivia Fellows, Emily Fister, Maura Forrest, Linda Givetash, Darryl Hol, Pauline Holdsworth, Hala Kamaliddin, Gian-Paolo Mendoza, Valentina Ruiz Leotaud, Emi Sasagawa, Peter Klein, David Rummel, Kathryn Gretsinger, Dan McKinney, Chantelle Bellrichard, Britney Dennison, Kim Frank, Videsh Kapoor, Dionne Bunsha, Mohammad Ghazal, Noah Katcha, Andrew Munroe, Ashima Narain, Varun Nayar, Dhanashree Oak, Ulrich Vital Ahotondji
Out of the Shadows
University of British Columbia / International Reporting Program

The finalists in the CWA CANADA / CAJ AWARD FOR LABOUR REPORTING are:

Melissa Ridgen
Hurting for work
APTN Investigates

Nick Purdon, Leonardo Palleja
Up close: Prison guards
CBC News – The National

Yutaka Dirks
What’s at stake in the fight for $15?
Freelance / Briarpatch

Krysia Collyer, Robert Cribb, Hannah James
Code White
Global 16X9 / Toronto Star

Lee-Anne Goodman
Badly backlogged Social Security Tribunal
The Canadian Press

The finalists in the CAJ / CNW GROUP STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE are:

Amara McLaughlin, Jesse Yardley
Risky decisions for Canadian cancer patients
Calgary Journal / Mount Royal University

Cameron Perrier
A Generation Taken: Stories of the Sixties Scoop in Alberta and aboriginal child welfare today
Calgary Journal / Mount Royal University

Jacqueline Gallant, Alex Vautour, Paige LeClair, Nicole Munro, Kevin Lemieux, MacKenzie Riley, Mary Fahey, Pat McCullough, Michael Bourgeois, Scott Hems, Dylan Hackett, Jan Wong, Pat Richard
The Fog of Rape: Normalizing a Campus Crime
The New Brunswick Beacon / St. Thomas University, Fredericton

Malone Mullin
Is this the radical road to prosperity?
The Varsity Magazine / University of Toronto

Consistent with information in the entry package instructions, judges had the discretion to name between one and five finalists in each award category. There were a total 230 entries for the 2015 awards program.

Congratulations to all our finalists. Your work has been outstanding, inspiring and a reminder of how despite the unending fiscal challenges facing our industry, Canadian journalists still produce plenty of amazing, important and impactful journalism. We thank you for entering and we hope to see you in Edmonton.

Read More